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Friday, Aug. 1, 2014

Citizen Forum

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Animals are people too

Editor:

As an inhabitant of this planet Earth, it sometimes seems as though we're separate, living in our own little worlds, distant from everyone somewhere out there. Of course, with the advent of the internet, the world has become a lot smaller, so you would think we'd realize our sameness more than our differences. We find that there are people who think just like us on the other side of the world. I play Words With Friends with a woman in Singapore as easily as with friends across town. We are united in ways we never would have dreamed possible a few short years ago. Yet we don't accept our kinship with all things living. It hasn't been that long ago that we were told that animals were unfeeling, heartless, soul-less creatures. For some reason it has become acceptable to think of ourselves as superior to all other life, and that leads us to think of our "tribe" as superior to others, and on it goes.

The deer which live in Eureka Springs are a good example of how we can accept our unity with all things living and come to some agreements which would not have seemed possible in times past. This fourth dimensional way of life we are embracing includes an understanding of communication. Every thought we have is a form of communicating. We are born with the innate ability to communicate with all things living, but it only takes a few times of telling your mom about something the dog said to you in order to be embarrassed out of that type of sharing -- and, eventually, that type of communication! And, perhaps, some of you will think I've finally leapt off the deep end, too. But that's okay!

A great shift in consciousness has been upon us for quite some time now. Although it hasn't been recognized by everyone, the evidence is all around. Part of that recognition is seeing that we are capable of more than we ever dreamed. In many ways this could be thought of as more difficult than before, because we realize we have a choice in this life. That we are not victims subject to circumstance, but that we can change our perceptions of life and see great change in our reality. I invite you to experiment in ways to utilize this ability in everyday life. Let's start with the creatures right in our backyard. If ants are invading your kitchen, try talking to them before you get out the Raid poison spray. If the deer are eating your flowers, point out the weeds you want them to eat and explain why they need to accept these boundaries. I know it sounds silly, but first try it in little ways. When you're walking your dog, experiment with thinking which way you want to go before you tug on the leash. If you're interested in finding out more about animal communications, there are numerous sources out there. The first book I ever read on this was Kinship With All Life by J. Allen Boone. It was written more than 50 years ago, but first noticed. As a popular movie asks us, "How far down the rabbit hole do you want to go?"

Thanks,

Marsha Havens


Correction, Please

Editor:

Please correct your article regarding the August 2nd Eureka Springs School Board meeting. The article stated that students with an "F" in a core class and a GPA below 2.0 for the semester may not compete in competitive activities. Actually it is an "F" or GPA below 2.0.

Also, the article states that a student may make up a failed class by completing an accredited course but the GPA would remain the same. This is not correct and completely undermines the effort that the Handbook Committee has labored to achieve, i.e. to make it possible for a student with an "F" to recover credit for that class, avoid the "F" rule and add the new grade to the GPA calculation, possibly bringing it above 2.0.

It may seem like an arcane distinction but let me assure you it is important to the student who is willing to show the initiative and take the online course that allows him or her to play ball the next semester!

It is the intention of Eureka Springs Public Schools not to be punitive but proactive.

Thanks in advance for this correction,

Albert J. Larson

Member, Eureka Springs Board of Education

(You can obtain a copy of the handbook @ the Superintendent's office. The pertinent section is on pg. 15)