Give aromatase inhibitor a try

Thursday, October 7, 2021

What do body builders and women with endometriosis have in common? For that matter, what is similar between people who wish to lose weight without losing muscle and those with breast cancer? Finally, what commonality is there between loss of bone density and prostate troubles both benign or malignant?

There is a fairly new supplement on the market called aromatase inhibitor. There are different brand names for this supplement and there are many “formula” products. The aromatase inhibitor product usually contains diindolymethane (DIM).

As usual, being skeptical, I researched aromatase inhibitors online at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?CMD=Search&DB=PubMed and found many pages of scientific and clinical studies documenting the usefulness. Now understand, these studies were done using prescribed aromatase inhibitors and not the natural supplement. There are a few different versions of the prescribed medicine as well so comparing directly to the natural product is not precise. Even so, I did not find negatives in using the prescribed medicine and many reports of benefit.

Clearly, benefits are noted for those with breast cancer slowing or stopping growth. Endometriosis is an ailment where there is extra tissue producing too much estrogen — this was greatly curtailed as well in some studies. The aromatase inhibitor reduces the amount of estrogen that is the culprit behind the ailments. Therefore, adding this supplement to calcium formulas that are based on algae (high absorption calcium) should improve bone density, I believe.

For men, the impact on the prostate gland clearly was not harmful, benefiting many by dropping PSA values in both benign and malignant conditions. Both men and women bodybuilders have been using this for years to reduce fat deposits while keeping or improving muscle mass. Many men and women report improved libido and performance, too. The similarities are all because there is too much estrogen in both women and men.

The supplement can be found in health food stores and ranges in price between $25 and $90. Some are blended with formulas more appropriate to men than women, so read the ingredient list carefully and follow the bottle directions.

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